Verb accent Definition and Examples


Verb:

accent

Definition as verb:

Verb

accent (third-person singular simple present accents, present participle accenting, simple past and past participle accented)

  1. (transitive) To express the accent of vocally; to utter with accent.
  2. (transitive) To mark emphatically; to emphasize; to accentuate; to make prominent.
  3. (transitive) To mark with written accents.
Translations
to express the accent of see accentuate
to emphasize
to mark with written accents see accentuate

More definition:


1.prominence of a syllable in terms of differential loudness, or of pitch, or length, or of a combination of these.

2.degree of prominence of a syllable within a word and sometimes of a word within a phrase, primary accent; secondary accent.

3.a mark indicating stress (as (·, ·), or (ˈ, ˌ), or (′, ″)), vowel quality (as French grave `,acute ´,circumflex ^, ), form (as French la “the” versus là “there”), or pitch.

4.any similar mark.

5.Prosody. regularly recurring stress. a mark indicating stress or some other distinction in pronunciation or value.

6.a musical tone or pattern of pitch inherent in a particular language either as a feature essential to the identification of a vowel or a syllable or to the general acoustic character of the language. Compare tone (def 7).

7.Often, accents. the unique speech patterns, inflections, choice of words, etc., that identify a particular individual, We recognized his accents immediately. She corrected me in her usual mild accents.the distinctive style or tone characteristic of an author, composer, etc., the unmistakably Brahmsian accents of the sonata; She recognized the familiar accents of Robert Frost in the poem.

8.a mode of pronunciation, as pitch or tone, emphasis pattern, or intonation, characteristic of or peculiar to the speech of a particular person, group, or locality, French accent; Southern accent. Compare tone (def 5).

9.such a mode of pronunciation recognized as being of foreign origin, He still speaks with an accent.

10.Music. a stress or emphasis given to certain notes. a mark noting this. stress or emphasis regularly recurring as a feature of rhythm. 1
1.Mathematics. a symbol used to distinguish similar quantities that differ in value, as in b ′, b ″, b ‴ (called b prime, b second or b double prime, b third or b triple prime, respectively). a symbol used to indicate a particular unit of measure, as feet (′) or inches (″), minutes (′) or seconds (″). a symbol used to indicate the order of a derivative of a function in calculus, as f′ (called f prime) is the first derivative of a function f. 1

2.words or tones expressive of some emotion. 1

3.accents, words; language; speech, He spoke in accents bold.1

4.distinctive character or tone, an accent of whining complaint.1

5.special attention, stress, or emphasis, an accent on accuracy.1

6.a detail that is emphasized by contrasting with its surroundings, a room decorated in navy blue with two red vases as accents.1

7.a distinctive but subordinate pattern, motif, color, flavor, or the like, The salad dressing had an accent of garlic.
1

8.to pronounce with prominence (a syllable within a word or a word within a phrase), to accent the first syllable of “into”; to accent the first word of “White House.”. Compare stress (def 12). 1

9.to mark with a written accent or accents.

20.to give emphasis or prominence to; accentuate.

1. the characteristic mode of pronunciation of a person or group, esp one that betrays social or geographical origin

2. the relative prominence of a spoken or sung syllable, esp with regard to stress or pitch Compare pitch1 (sense 28), stress (sense 3)

3. a mark (such as ˈ , ˌ , ´ or `) used in writing to indicate the stress or prominence of a syllable. Such a mark may also be used to indicate that a written syllable is to be pronounced, esp when such pronunciation is not usual, as in turnèd

4. any of various marks or symbols conventionally used in writing certain languages to indicate the quality of a vowel, or for some other purpose, such as differentiation of homographs See acute (sense 10), grave2 (sense 5), circumflex

5. (in some languages, such as Chinese) any of the tones that have phonemic value in distinguishing one word from another Compare tone (sense 7)

6. rhythmic stress in verse or prose

7. (music) stress placed on certain notes in a piece of music, indicated by a symbol printed over the note concerned the rhythmic pulse of a piece or passage, usually represented as the stress on the first beat of each bar See also syncopation

8. (maths) either of two superscript symbols indicating a specific unit, such as feet (′), inches (″), minutes of arc (′), or seconds of arc (″)

9. a distinctive characteristic of anything, such as taste, pattern, style, etc

10. particular attention or emphasis, an accent on learning1
1. a strongly contrasting detail, a blue rug with red accents verb (transitive) (ækˈsɛnt) 1

2. to mark with an accent in writing, speech, music, etc1

3. to lay particular emphasis or stress on Word OriginC14, via Old French from Latin accentus, from ad- to + cantus chant, song. The Latin is a rendering of Greek prosōidia a song sung to music, the tone of a syllableCollins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollinsPublishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source
late 14c., "particular mode of pronunciation," from Middle French accent, from Old French acent (13c.), from Latin accentus "song added to speech," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + cantus "a singing," past participle of canere "to sing" (see chant (v.)). Loan-translation of Greek prosoidia, from pros- "to" + oide "song," which apparently described the pitch scheme in Greek verse. The decorating sense of "something that emphasizes or highlights" is from 197

2.
"to pronounce with accent or stress," 1520s, from Middle French accenter, from Old French acenter, from accent (see accent (n.)). Related, Accented; accenting.

Examples:

Maybe it was the soft accent that held her attention.

The thick accent and clumsy wording suddenly annoyed Carmen.

"I'll take you to the mall," he said in his tight accent but as I started to move toward his old car, Detective Dick, my phone in his hand, yelled.

Her accent was exotic and complemented her sexy, sultry voice.

His French accent rolled off his deep voice in a way that made her smile.

His order was calm, the slight accent in his voice foreign.

She froze at the cultured voice with its rich accent, knowing the woman at the nearest table spoke about her.

The three stood looking at each other, speechless, until Jackson broke the silence in his best Hispanic accent, "Lucy… you got some splainin' to do."

"This ain't right," he said, his Southern accent plain even to his ears.

One accent only is to be used, the acute, to denote the syllable on which stress is laid.

In the British army an officer is said to be "seconded" (with the accent on the second syllable) when he is employed on special service outside his regiment, his name being retained on the regimental list, but his place being filled by promotion of other officers.

The principal thing that is lacking is sentence accent and variety in the inflection of phrases.

All this they read with saucer eyes, and erect and primitive curiosity, and with unwearied gizzard, whose corrugations even yet need no sharpening, just as some little four-year-old bencher his two-cent gilt-covered edition of Cinderella--without any improvement, that I can see, in the pronunciation, or accent, or emphasis, or any more skill in extracting or inserting the moral.

I heard that a distinguished wise man and reformer asked him if he did not want the world to be changed; but he answered with a chuckle of surprise in his Canadian accent, not knowing that the question had ever been entertained before, "No, I like it well enough."

Prince Bagration, uttering his words with an Oriental accent, spoke particularly slowly, as if to impress the fact that there was no need to hurry.



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