Verb accord Definition and Examples


Verb:

accord

Definition as verb:

(transitive) To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust. (transitive) To bring (people) to an agreement; to reconcile, settle, adjust or harmonize. (intransitive) To agree or correspond; to be in harmony. (intransitive) To agree in pitch and tone. (transitive, dated, law) To grant as suitable or proper; to concede or award. (intransitive, obsolete) To give consent. (intransitive, archaic) To arrive at an agreement.

More definition:


1.to be in agreement or harmony; agree.


2.to make agree or correspond; adapt.

3.to grant; bestow, to accord due praise.

4.Archaic. to settle; reconcile.


5.proper relationship or proportion; harmony.

6.a harmonious union of sounds, colors, etc.

7.consent or concurrence of opinions or wills; agreement.

8.an international agreement; settlement of questions outstanding among nations.


9.of one's own accord, without being asked or told; voluntarily, We did the extra work of our own accord.

1. agreement; conformity; accordance (esp in the phrase in accord with)

2. consent or concurrence of opinion

3. with one accord, unanimously

4. pleasing relationship between sounds, colours, etc; harmony

5. a settlement of differences, as between nations; compromise

6. of one's own accord, voluntarily verb

7. to be or cause to be in harmony or agreement

8. (transitive) to grant; bestow Derived Formsaccordable, adjectiveaccorder, noun Word OriginC12, via Old French from Latin ad- to + cord-, stem of cor heartCollins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollinsPublishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source
early 12c., from Old French acorder (12c.) "reconcile, agree, be in harmony," from Vulgar Latin *accordare "make agree," literally "be of one heart, bring heart to heart," from Latin ad- "to" + cor (genitive cordis) "heart" (see heart). Related, Accorded; according.
late 13c., accourd, from Old French acord "agreement," a back-formation from acorder (see accord (v.)).
see, of one's own accord The American Heritage® Idioms DictionaryCopyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. Cite This Source

Examples:

The tears stopped of their own accord after a while, and the calm of her mind brought back her focus.

I knew she wasn't doing that of her own accord, that you had put her up to it, so I decided to let her have her fun.

A silver Honda Accord pulled up and the window rolled down.

(For 1900 or Igor.) The movement of people from one place to another without the immediate intention of returning is known as migration, and accord ing to its origin it may be classed as centrifugal (directed a particular area) and centripetal (directed towards a particular area).

In recent years classifications in part agreeing with the older schemes but largely original, in accord with researches on the comparative anatomy of the insects, have been put forward.

But when a committee of the Royal Asiatic Society, with George Grote at its head, decided that the translations of an Assyrian text made independently by the scholars just named were at once perfectly intelligible and closely in accord with one another, scepticism was silenced, and the new science was admitted to have made good its claims. Naturally the early investigators did not fathom all the niceties of the language, and the work of grammatical investigation has gone on continuously under the auspices of a constantly growing band of workers.

Last night when I got in bed, she stole into my arms of her own accord and kissed me for the first time, and I thought my heart would burst, so full was it of joy.

Sometimes he joined in a conversation which interested him and, regardless of whether any "gentlemen of the embassy" were present or not, lispingly expressed his views, which were sometimes not at all in accord with the accepted tone of the moment.

Rostov charged the French because he could not restrain his wish for a gallop across a level field; and in the same way the innumerable people who took part in the war acted in accord with their personal characteristics, habits, circumstances, and aims.

"Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."

And as usual nothing happened in accord with the disposition.



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