Verb ant Definition and Examples


Verb:

ant

Definition as verb:

(ornithology) To rub insects, especially ants, on one's body, perhaps to control parasites or clean feathers.

More definition:


1.any of numerous black, red, brown, or yellow social insects of the family Formicidae, of worldwide distribution especially in warm climates, having a large head with inner jaws for chewing and outer jaws for carrying and digging, and living in highly organized colonies containing wingless female workers, a winged queen, and, during breeding seasons, winged males, some species being noted for engaging in warfare, slavemaking, or the cultivation of food sources.


2.have ants in one's pants, Slang. to be impatient or eager to act or speak.

1.antenna.

2.antonym.

1.Antarctica.

1.variant of anti- before a vowel or h, antacid; anthelmintic .

1.a suffix forming adjectives and nouns from verbs, occurring originally in French and Latin loanwords (pleasant; constant; servant) and productive in English on this model; -ant,has the general sense “characterized by or serving in the capacity of” that named by the stem (ascendant; pretendant), especially in the formation of nouns denoting human agents in legal actions or other formal procedures (tenant; defendant; applicant; contestant). In technical and commercial coinages, -ant,is a suffix of nouns denoting impersonal physical agents (propellant; lubricant; deodorant). In general, -ant,can be added only to bases of Latin origin, with a very few exceptions, as coolant .

1.Chiefly British Dialect. contraction of am not.

2.Dialect. ain't.

1. any small social insect of the widely distributed hymenopterous family Formicidae, typically living in highly organized colonies of winged males, wingless sterile females (workers), and fertile females (queens), which are winged until after mating See also army ant, fire ant, slave ant, wood ant related adjective formic

2. white ant, another name for a termite

3. (slang) have ants in one's pants, to be restless or impatient Word OriginOld English ǣmette; related to Old High German āmeiza, Old Norse meita; see emmet ant- prefix
1. a variant of anti- antacid an't contraction (mainly Brit)
1. (ɑːnt) a rare variant spelling of aren't

2. (dialect) (eɪnt) a variant spelling of ain't -ant suffix, suffix
1. causing or performing an action or existing in a certain condition; the agent that performs an action, pleasant, claimant, deodorant, protestant, servant Word Originfrom Latin -ant-, ending of present participles of the first conjugationCollins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollinsPublishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source
c.1500, from Middle English ampte (late 14c.), from Old English æmette "ant," from West Germanic *amaitjo (cf. Old High German ameiza, German Ameise) from a compound of bases *ai- "off, away" + *mai- "cut," from PIE *mai- "to cut" (cf. maim). Thus the insect's name is, etymologically, "the biter off." As þycke as ameten crepeþ in an amete hulle [chronicle of Robert of Gloucester, 1297] Emmet survived into 20c. as an alternative form. White ant "termite" is from 172

9. To have ants in one's pants "be nervous and fidgety" is from 1934, made current by a popular song; antsy embodies the same notion.
agent or instrumental suffix, from Old French and French -ant, from Latin -antem, accusative of -ans, present participle suffix of many Latin verbs.

1. antenna (shortwave transmission)

2. Antlia (constellation) ant.
1. antenna

2. anterior

3. antiquarian

4. antiquity

5. antonym Ant. Antarctica The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third EditionCopyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. Cite This Source

Examples:

In 1075 he caused the investiture of ecclesiastica dignitaries by secular potentates of any degree to be condemned These two reforms, striking at the most cherished privileges ant most deeply-rooted self-indulgences of the aristocratic caste ii Europe, inflamed the bitterest hostility.

To these follow the tanagers (Tanagridae), with upwards of forty genera (only one of which crosses the border), and about 300 species; the piculules (Dendrocolaptidae), with as many genera, and over 200 species; the ant-thrushes, (Formicariidae), with more than thirty genera, and nearly 200 species; together with other groups which, if not so large as those just named, are yet just as well defined, and possibly more significant, namely, the tapaculos (Pteroptochidae), the toucans (Rhamphastidae), the jacamars (Galbulidae), the motmots (Monotidae), the todies (Todidae), the trumpeters (Psophiidae), and the screamers (Palamedeidae); besides such isolated forms as the seriema (Cariama), and the sun-bittern (Eurypyga).

So the text "the myrmekoleon bath perished for that he had no nourishment" set them pondering, and others reproduced their meditations, with the following result: "The Physiologus relates about the ant-lion: his father hath the shape of a lion, his mother that of an ant; the father liveth upon flesh, and the mother upon herbs.

16; presages recovery or death of patients); (4) the pelican (recalls its young to life by its own blood); (5) the owl (or nyktikorax; loves darkness and solitude); (6) the eagle (renews its youth by sunlight and bathing in a fountain); (7) the phoenix (revives from fire); (8) the hoopoe (redeems its parents from the ills of old age); (9) the wild ass (suffers no male besides itself); (1 o) the viper (born at the cost of both its parents' death); (I I) the serpent (sheds its skin; puts aside its venom before drinking; is afraid of man in a state of nudity; hides its head and abandons the rest of its body); (12) the ant (orderly and laborious; prevents stored grain from germinating; distinguishes wheat from barley on the stalk); (13) the sirens and onocentaurs (Isa.

But two instances of extreme deviation from the ordinary mode of life due, apparently, like ant-mimicry, solely, if not wholly, to the persecution of Hymenoptera, may be cited as illustrations of the profound effect upon habit brought about by long-continued persecution from enemies of this kind.

The ant was carrying a grain of wheat as large as itself.

Just as he spoke, the ant lost its footing and fell to the ground.

In the meanwhile there came along a single red ant on the hillside of this valley, evidently full of excitement, who either had despatched his foe, or had not yet taken part in the battle; probably the latter, for he had lost none of his limbs; whose mother had charged him to return with his shield or upon it.

Holding a microscope to the first-mentioned red ant, I saw that, though he was assiduously gnawing at the near fore leg of his enemy, having severed his remaining feeler, his own breast was all torn away, exposing what vitals he had there to the jaws of the black warrior, whose breastplate was apparently too thick for him to pierce; and the dark carbuncles of the sufferer's eyes shone with ferocity such as war only could excite.



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